Canada in a Changing Climate: Advancing our Knowledge for Action (2023)

This National Assessment Process, led by Natural Resources Canada, assesses how and why Canada’s climate is changing; the impacts of these changes on our communities, environment and economy; and how we’re adapting across the country. Canadians can read these reports to learn about the climate change impacts they’re facing, make sound decisions and take action to adapt.

Featured reports

View or download the following reports in full or by chapter. Interactive digital versions of all reports are available here. You can also explore case studies from the reports through the interactive Map of Adaptation Actions.

Available now

National Issues Report (led by Natural Resources Canada, 2021)

Regional Perspectives Report (led by Natural Resources Canada, 2020-2022)

Canada in a Changing Climate: Advancing our Knowledge for Action (1)

This report provides an assessment of the risks of climate change to the health of Canadians and to the health care system. The report was developed by more than 80 science experts from across Canada, with input from health sector officials, civil society organizations, and the public. You can alsodownload individual chapters.

Canada in a Changing Climate: Advancing our Knowledge for Action (2)

Want a national perspective on how climate change impacts our communities, environment and economy; and how we’re adapting? Get insights into Canada’s key vulnerabilities and knowledge gaps as well as new and innovative approaches you can use to adapt in your own context. You can also download individual chapters and infographics with the key messages from each chapter.

This report provides regional perspectives on how climate change is impacting our communities, environment and economy, and how we are adapting. Chapters from this report will be released on a rolling basis during 2020–2022. You can download individual chapters and infographics with the key messages from each chapter.

Coming soon

Indigenous stand-alone report (title to be confirmed)(2022)
Co-led by GraemeReed, Senior Policy Advisor at the Assembly of First Nations, and ShariFox, Research Scientist with the National Snow and Ice Data Center of the University of Colorado Boulder, this report will draw on Indigenous knowledge, perspectives and experiences. It will explore multidimensional and intersecting aspects of climate change impacts and adaptation.

Canada in a Changing Climate: Enhanced Synthesis (Led by Natural Resources Canada, 2023)
As part of Canada in a Changing Climate, the Government of Canada will produce a report that draws from, and provides added value to, the findings of all the other reports.

Previously published

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Canada’s Changing Climate Report in Light of the Latest Global Science Assessment (led by Environment and Climate Change Canada, 2022)

This report provides some perspectives on the implications of the findings of Climate Change 2021: The Physical Science Basis for the conclusions of the 2019 Canada’s Changing Climate Report. Climate Change 2021 was the Working Group I Contribution to the Sixth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

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Canada’s ChangingClimate Report (led by Environment and Climate Change Canada, 2019)

How and why has Canada’s climate changed and how is it projected to change in the future? This report documents and explores changes in temperature, precipitation, snow, ice, permafrost, freshwater availability and conditions in Canada’s three oceans. You can alsodownload individual chapters.

You can alsoview or download past reportsin the GEOSCAN database. They include discussions of regional and sectoral perspectives on climate change impacts in Canada as well as vulnerabilities and adaptation measures.

The National Assessment Process

At Natural Resources Canada, we lead a collaborative process that involves subject-matter experts from all orders of government, Indigenous organizations, universities, professional and non-governmental groups, and the private sector. The public is also involved through meetings, conferences and online engagement tools. A 20-member advisory committee provides the Process with ongoing advice and input. Together, we follow a series of steps to produce each report:

Launch: We engage broadly to discuss the scope and goals of an upcoming assessment
Plan: We plan the assessment’s products (i.e., outcomes) and adjust the approach to best meet our goals
Build author teams: We invite subject matter experts to lead chapters and form writing teams that represent a range of expertise and regions in Canada
Assess: These teams gather, analyze and assess information, then draft assessment chapters
Review and scientific editing: Experts review the drafts for accuracy and completeness
Finalize: Author teams work with the Assessment Secretariat to finalize the content
Release: We translate, design and distribute the assessment products

Our teams

The Advisory Committee consists of 20members who bring a wide range of expertise to the table. Members participate in their personal capacity as experts, not as representatives of their organizations. They offer input on the assessment’s approach and goals, the report outline, the supporting products and whom to involve. They also help communicate the final results. The Advisory Committee is led and chaired by Natural Resources Canada.

  • Show me the Advisory Committee

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    Gord Beal

    Gord is Vice-President of Research, Guidance and Support at Chartered Professional Accountants (CPA) Canada. His areas of focus include strategic financial management, financial reporting, reporting and disclosure beyond generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP), auditing and other assurance, board governance and organizational oversight, risk, sustainability, performance management, information management and technology, and contemporary professional issues. He became a chartered accountant in 1990 and holds a BA in Commerce and Economics, a Bachelor of Education and a Master of Education in Organizational Learning.

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    Robert Capozi

    Robert is the Adaptation Specialist with the New Brunswick Climate Change Secretariat. His role focuses on facilitating the dissemination of climate change knowledge and technical expertise to stakeholders, with the ultimate goal of creating more resilient communities, improving local economies and advancing research. Prior to the Secretariat, Rob held the positions of Coastal Lands Manager with the New Brunswick Department of Environment, Habitat Specialist with the New Brunswick Department of Natural Resources and Wetlands Management Specialist with Ducks Unlimited Canada.

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    Stewart J. Cohen

    Stewart is a senior researcher with the Climate Research Division of Environment and Climate Change Canada and an Adjunct Professor with the Department of Forest Resources Management at the University of British Columbia. Stewart was co-author of Climate Change in the 21st Century, published by McGill-Queen’s University Press. For the last 25 years, he has also been a member of author teams for several publications of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), the international body for assessing the science related to climate change. Stewart’s IPCC work has included the IPCC 5th Assessment Report, Climate Change 2014 – Impacts, Adaptation and Vulnerability.

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    Ellen Curtis

    Ellen is the Director of Education for The Royal Canadian Geographical Society. Over the past six years she has worked with numerous public and private organizations to develop engaging educational programs that work to advance geographic literacy in Canada. She is a passionate educator with a BA and an MA in Education from the University of Ottawa.

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    Susan Evans

    Susan is currently a Policy Advisor with the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Affairs’ Agri-food Climate Change Policy Unit, which is responsible for leading and coordinating the Ministry’s efforts on climate change mitigation and adaptation. In Susan’s previous role with WWF-Canada, she provided science advice to various program areas on building climate resilient outcomes, and led the implementation of project work to demonstrate these concepts in practice.Susan holds a M.Sc. in Zoology from the University of Guelph andhas actively participated in various Government of Canada science advisory processes, including as an advisor to the former National Round Table on the Environment and the Economy.

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    (Video) Health of Canadians in a Changing Climate: Advancing our Knowledge for Action

    Elaine Fox

    Elaine is the Manager of Climate Change Adaptation/Mitigation in the Department of Sustainable Development of theProvince of Manitoba.
    Elaine draws on a broad range of knowledge and skills to provide leadership and expertise to government, stakeholders, municipalities, Indigenous organizations, business, advocates, and academia. Her applied experience in inclusiveness and collaboration work enhances an integrated legislative, regulatory and policy framework that guides sustainable development, a low carbon economy and adaptation to a changing climate future. Prior to her current role, Elaine worked as a Manager in both Strategic Policy, Sustainable Development and for the Department of Water Stewardship, Planning and Coordination.

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    Pierre Gosselin

    Pierre currently works primarily at the Quebec Public Health Institute (INSPQ), where he coordinates the joint Ouranos-INSPQ research program in climate change and health. He was also in charge of the Health component of the Quebec Action Plan on Climate Change (2007-2017) and remains involved in some projects. He is also a clinical professor in preventive medicine at Université Laval and an associate at Institut national de la recherche scientifique, both in Quebec City. Pierre was trained as a physician (Université Laval) and in environmental health (University of California at Berkeley).

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    Ewa Jackson

    Ewa currently works with ICLEI Canada where she has led the development of ICLEI’s Guidebook, Changing Climate Changing Communities, a compendium of resources that provides a milestone-based framework to assist local governments in the creation of adaptation plan; the guidebook was the result of a three-year process of research, collaboration and piloting with experts in the field. She has worked with municipal governments for over 16 years in the fields of sustainability, public participation and climate change. She holds degrees from the University of Toronto in environmental management and political science and is currently pursuing her MA in Environment and Business. Ewa’s particular field of interest is in the area of climate communications.

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    Anne Kendrick

    Anne is a senior policy advisor for the national representational Inuit organization, Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami (ITK).She provides policy guidance on Inuit rights and interests on a variety of climate change, food security, Indigenous knowledge and wildlife management topics. Before joining ITK, Anne worked for more than 15 years as an academic and practitioner on community-based resource management issues in the North. Anne has an interdisciplinary background in the natural and social sciences (BSc, biology, McGill; MA, human geography, McGill; PhD, natural resources and environmental management, Manitoba).

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    Paul Kovacs

    Paul is the founder and Executive Director of the Institute for Catastrophic Loss Reduction (ICLR) at Western University, an independent, not-for-profit centre for multi-disciplinary disaster prevention research and communications. Paul’s research interest is insurance and adaptation to climate extremes. This includes action to build communities resilient to damage from urban flooding, tornadoes, catastrophic earthquakes and interface wildfire. Since 1996, Paul has been a volunteer with the United Nations’ Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), the international body for assessing the science related to climate change.

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    David Lapp

    David currently works at Engineers Canada where, since 2005, he has led a national project to assess the engineering vulnerability of public infrastructure to the impacts of a changing climate, making presentations and giving workshops and courses across Canada, as well as internationally. This project developed the infrastructure climate risk assessment tool known as the PIEVC Protocol, which has been applied to a variety of infrastructure systems across Canada and internationally. David graduated with a degree in geological engineering from the University of Toronto in 1978. After nearly 20 years working as a consulting engineer in Canada’s Arctic region, he joined Engineers Canada in July 1997.

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    Caroline Larrivée

    Caroline leads the Vulnerabilities, Impacts and Adaptation Group at Ouranos, where she has worked since October 2006. Her previous positions there included work as a specialist in the Vulnerabilities, Impacts and Adaptation Group and as coordinator of the northern environment and urban areas programs. As an urban planner in the private sector, academic institutions and at the Kativik Regional Government, she collaborated on research into the impacts of climate change on northern communities. Caroline holds a BA in urban planning from Université de Montréal.

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    Fred Lipschultz

    Fred is a Senior Scientist Contractor at the National Coordinating Office of the U.S. Global Change Research Program, a collaboration of 13 federal agencies to build a knowledge base that informs human responses to climate and global change through coordinated and integrated Federal programs of research, education, communication and decision support. His responsibilities include coordinating all aspects of the regional climate assessment across the nation, including provision of relevant climate information and necessary coordination across the federal government. He is an oceanographer who has worked at the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) and U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA).

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    Patricia Manuel

    Patricia is the Director of the School of Planning at Dalhousie University, Halifax with additional appointments in the Dalhousie School of Occupational Therapy and the Coastal and Marine Management Program of the University Centre of the Westfjords, Akureyri University, Iceland. She teaches and conducts applied research in environmental and community planning.Patricia works extensively with watershed, community planning and environmental groups to achieve environmentally sound land-use planning and development.She was a member of the National Coastal Assessment Advisory Committee (Natural Resources Canada) and the Atlantic Climate Adaptations Solutions Association Expert Panel on Climate Change Adaptation. She is currently a member of the board of directors of the Coastal Zone Canada Association.

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    Linda Mortsch

    Linda has addressed climate change issues related to water resources, coastal zones and urban areas over a 30-year career. Her goal has been to facilitate adaptation planning and decision-making. Linda has contributed to all Canadian National Climate Change Assessments and since 1989, she has played a role in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), the international body for assessing the science related to climate change. While retired from Environment and Climate Change Canada, Linda has an appointment at the University of Waterloo’s Faculty of Environment where she undertakes studies that support adaptation capacity building and moving from adaptation planning to implementation.

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    Graeme Reed

    Graeme Reed is of mixed Anishinaabe and European descent. He works as a Senior Policy Analyst at the Assembly of First Nations (AFN), where he advocates for the inclusion of First Nations in climate and energy policy. He is an Action Canada Fellow, holding a Bachelor of Environmental Science from the University of Waterloo and a Master of Science from McGill University.

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    Marjorie Shepherd

    Marjorie is the Director of Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC)’s Climate Research Division (CRD). The dual focus of developing science information and advice for adaptation and mitigation guide the priorities of this research. She has worked with ECCC since 1990 and has a MSc in Atmospheric Chemistry (1989). She currently represents Canada internationally as delegation member for two Commissions of the World Meteorological Organization: one on Climatology and one on Atmospheric Science, and for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

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    Jim Vanderwal

    Jim is the Fraser Basin Council’s Senior Manager responsible for the Climate Change and Air Quality Program. He has held progressively senior roles at the Council since 1999, developing new initiatives related to river management, stakeholder engagement, energy and emissions planning, climate change adaptation, green fleet management and clean energy development. Jim completed a BASc in Electrical Engineering from the University of British Columbia. He completed an MSc in Resource Management from the University of British Columbia, specializing in the development of public processes that link technical research with broad public engagement.

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    Fiona Warren – Chair of the Assessment Advisory Committee

    Fiona is the Assessment Manager with the Climate Change Impacts and Adaptation Division at Natural Resources Canada. She leads Canada in a Changing Climate, the national knowledge assessment, and the development and editing of the National Issues and Regional Perspectives reports. Fiona has extensive experience working on science assessments as a science editor, lead author and project coordinator (2004, 2008 and 2016). She also led the development of the 2014 assessment entitled Canada in a Changing Climate: Sector Perspectives on Impacts and Adaptation. She was a contributing author of the North America chapter in the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and has been an expert reviewer of several reports and papers on climate change issues. She holds a Master of Science in Geography from McMaster University and a Bachelor of Science (with honours) in Environmental Science from Queen’s University.

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    Thomas White

    Thomas leads the Climate Risk Management Team in British Columbia’s Climate Action Secretariat. The secretariat, in the Ministry of Environment, leads and coordinates research, analysis, development and implementation of programs, policies and legislation relating to climate change adaptation and works collaboratively with other orders of government, research institutions, non-governmental organizations and professional and industry associations with the goal of ensuring that British Columbia is prepared for and resilient to the impacts of climate change.

Lead authors are responsible for delivering their chapters and ensuring that writing teams have the appropriate expertise and follow the formatting and writing guidelines. They also respond to the reviewers’ comments.

  • Show me the lead authors for the Canada’s Changing Climate Report

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    (Video) Ontario Chapter of Canada in a Changing Climate: Regional Perspective Report

    Nathan Gillet, Spokesperson for CCCR Chapter 2, Understanding Observed Global Climate Change

    Nathan Gillett is a senior research scientist with Environment and Climate Change Canada’s Climate Research Division. His research focuses on understanding the causes of observed climate change. He is a Coordinating Lead Author of the chapter on human influence on climate in the upcoming IPCC Sixth Assessment Report. Nathan received his PhD in atmospheric physics from the University of Oxford in 2001.

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    Greg Flato, Spokesperson for CCCR Chapter 3, Modelling Future Climate Change

    Greg Flato is a senior research scientist with Environment and Climate Change Canada’s Climate Research Division. He has worked on the development of a series of global climate models used to simulate historical climate variations and project future climate change. He is an elected Vice Chair of the IPCC’s Working Group I and was a Coordinating Lead Author of the model evaluation chapter in the IPCC Fifth Assessment. Dr Flato received his BSc and MSc in Civil Engineering from the University of Alberta, and a PhD in Engineering Science from Dartmouth College, USA.

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    Xuebin Zhang, Spokesperson for CCCR Chapter 4, Changes in Temperature and Precipitation Across Canada

    Xuebin Zhang is a senior research scientist with Environment and Climate Change Canada’s Climate Research Division. His main research focus is past and future changes in weather and climate extremes. He was a lead author for the IPCC Special Report Managing the Risks of Extreme Events and Disasters to Advance Climate Change Adaptation and the IPCC Working Group I Fifth Assessment Report. He is a Coordinating Lead Author of the climate extremes chapter in the IPCC Sixth Assessment Report. Dr. Zhang has a background in engineering hydrology and received a PhD degree in Physics (Climatology) from University of Lisbon, Portugal.

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    Chris Derksen, Spokesperson for CCCR Chapter 5, Changes in Snow, Ice and Permafrost Across Canada

    Chris Derksen is a research scientist with Environment and Climate Change Canada’s Climate Research Division, and holds an adjunct faculty position with the Department of Geography and Environmental Management at University of Waterloo. His research focuses on the use of satellite derived datasets and climate models to understand how snow cover and sea ice interact with the global climate system. Chris is a lead author of the upcoming International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Special Report on Oceans and Cryosphere in a Changing Climate. Chris received his Ph.D from the University of Waterloo in 2001.

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    Barrie Bonsal, Spokesperson for Chapter 6: Changes in Freshwater Availability Across Canada

    Barrie Bonsal is a senior research scientist with the Watershed Hydrology and Ecology Research Division of Environment and Climate Change Canada and an adjunct professor in the Department of Geography at the University of Saskatchewan. His research examines the impacts of past climate variability and extremes (including droughts and floods), and projected future climate change on the freshwater resources of Canada. Barrie has contributed to past national assessments of climate change impacts and adaptation, and to the international Snow, Water, Ice and Permafrost in the Arctic assessment. He obtained a PhD in Physical Geography from the University of Saskatchewan in 1996.

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    Blair Greenan, Spokesperson for CCCR Chapter 7: Changes in Oceans Surrounding Canada

    Blair is a research scientist at Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO), based at the Bedford Institute of Oceanography in Halifax. His research group focuses on ocean stressors, ranging from marine oil spills to climate change effects such as ocean acidification. He is the Scientific Director for the Argo Canada program, which contributes to the International Argo program in advancing global real-time observations of the ocean. Recently, Blair’s research has focused on developing climate change adaptation tools related to coastal infrastructure and fisheries management. Blair received his Ph.D. from the Department of Physics at the University of Toronto.

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    Elizabeth Bush, Project lead and spokesperson for development of Canada’s Changing Climate Report as a contribution to the national assessment.

    Elizabeth Bush is the project lead for development of Canada’s Changing Climate Report. She is a senior climate science advisor with Environment and Climate Change Canada’s Climate Research Division. She works at the interface of science and policy on climate change, helping to communicate climate change science and integrate science into decision-making. She has participated in a number of national and international science assessments of climate change and air quality. Elizabeth received a Masters of Science (Biology) degree and a Master of Arts (Environmental Studies) degree from the University of Toronto.

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    Marjorie Shepherd, Spokesperson for development of Canada’s Changing Climate Report as a contribution to the national assessment.

    Marjorie Shepherd is the Director of Environment and Climate Change Canada’s Climate Research Division (CRD). This research group of approximately 110 people spans greenhouse gas observations, climate processes and cryosphere research, attribution and detection of climate trends and variability, development of earth system models for global and regional climate projections, and climate impact studies. The dual focus of developing scientific tools and advice for adaptation and mitigation guide the priorities of this research program. Ms. Shepherd received a Master of Science degree in Atmospheric Chemistry, from York University.

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    Daniel Peters, French spokesperson, Chapter 6, Changes in Freshwater Availability Across Canada

    Daniel Peters is a research scientist with the Watershed Hydrology and Ecology Research Division of Environment and Climate Change Canada. He is an Associate Professor in the Department of Geography at the University of Victoria where he taught Hydrology for 10+ years and supervises Graduate student thesis work. His research examines the effects of climate variability/change and development (eg, flow regulation, water abstraction) on the hydrology of river, lake, wetland, and delta systems in Canada. Daniel is an Associate Editor of the Canadian Water Resources Journal. He obtained a PhD in Watershed Ecosystems from Trent University in 2003.

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    Denis Gilbert, French spokesperson, Chapter 7, Changes in Oceans Surrounding Canada

    Denis Gilbert is a physical oceanographer who contributed to the Oceans chapter of CCCR. His main areas of expertise are ocean currents, temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen and sea level. He completed a B.Sc. in Physics at the University of Québec at Chicoutimi in 1985, and a Ph.D. in physical oceanography at Dalhousie University in 1990. He has been working for Fisheries and Oceans Canada since 1991.

  • Show me the lead authors for the Regional Perspectives Report

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    Craig Brown – British Columbia Chapter (co-lead)

    Craig holds a PhD in Environmental Applied Science and Management from Ryerson University and works as an interdisciplinary researcher, consultant, and educator in the areas of urban sustainability and climate resilience. He has supported and managed projects at various scales relating to building and urban design, energy efficiency, climate resilience, flood risk management, green infrastructure, and monitoring and evaluation frameworks.

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    Sabine Dietz – Atlantic Chapter

    Sabine is a biologist, and environmental and climate change adaptation practitioner with Aster Group Environmental Services Co-op in New Brunswick. She was the New Brunswick coordinator for the Atlantic Canada Regional Adaptation Collaborative (Atlantic Climate Adaptation Solutions), from 2010 to 2013, and has been working with the province of NB, municipalities, land use planners and environmental organizations on various climate change adaptation files and projects since then. Her specific interests lie in the area of natural systems, how they are changing and how we need to change our approach to conservation in a changing climate, as well as their role in reducing and mitigating impacts from climate change. She holds a BA in Natural Resource Studies from Trent University, a Master’s in Environmental Studies from the Université de Moncton, and a PhD in Biology from the University of NB.

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    Allan G. Douglas – Ontario Chapter (co-lead)

    Allan is the President of the Climate Risk Institute, located at Laurentian University, in Sudbury, Ontario. Since 2002, he has been developing adaptation resources and delivering them to domestic and international decision makers. Allan played leading roles in two regional vulnerability assessments in Ontario and co-authored an ecosystems vulnerability assessment guidebook for Ontario. He has contributed content to previous national assessments of climate change impact and adaptation and acted as an expert reviewer for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). Allan has expertise in climate science; climate change impact, vulnerability and risk assessment; policy development and adaptation planning in natural resource sectors. In 2016, Al co-chaired Adaptation Canada 2016, Canada’s first national symposium on climate change adaptation since 2005. He has also been a member of Canada’s Expert Panel on Climate Change Adaptation and Resilience Results.

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    Robert Gifford – British Columbia Chapter (co-lead)

    Robert is a professor of Psychology and Environmental Studies at the University of Victoria. He studies resource management, climate-related behaviour, attitudes, and interventions, and the perception of architecture. In addition to his research, Robert is also a faculty member of the Institute for Integrated Energy Systems (IESVic), and a Program Committee member with Pacific Institute for Climate Solutions. He is the Founding Director of the Interdisciplinary Program in the Human Dimensions of Climate Change. Robert was Chief Editor of the Journal of Environmental Psychology from 2004 to 2016. He holds a Ph.D. from Simon Fraser University.

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    Bronwyn Hancock – Northern Canada Chapter (co-lead)

    Bronwyn is the Associate Vice President Research Development for Yukon College. She is responsible for the planning, development and implementation of research at Yukon College, and for the development of positive relationships with the broader research community in support of northern research. In addition, she oversees research activities at the Yukon College’s Yukon Research Centre, which includes expertise in climate change, northern energy innovation, mine life cycles, resources and sustainable development in the Arctic, and biodiversity monitoring. Prior to this position, Bronwyn served as Manager of the Northern Climate ExChange, the climate change research group at the Yukon Research Centre, overseeing a team that focuses on studying the impacts and adaptation opportunities associated with climate change in Yukon and northern Canada. Bronwyn holds a doctorate in earth sciences from the University of Waterloo.

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    Caroline Larrivée – Quebec Chapter

    (Video) Health of Canadians in a Changing Climate: Chapter 6 - Infectious diseases

    Caroline leads the Vulnerabilities, Impacts and Adaptation Group at Ouranos, where she has worked since October 2006. Her previous positions there included work as a specialist in the Vulnerabilities, Impacts and Adaptation Group and as coordinator of the northern environment and urban areas programs. As an urban planner in the private sector, academic institutions and at the Kativik Regional Government, she collaborated on research into the impacts of climate change on northern communities. Caroline holds a BA in urban planning from Université de Montréal.

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    David Pearson – Ontario Chapter (co-lead)

    David is an earth scientist and Professor in the School of the Environment at Laurentian University. He was the Project Director and founding Director of Science North from 1980 to 1986 and has hosted two science television series as well as a weekly radio spot. From 2002 to 2007 David chaired the Ontario office of the Canadian Climate Impacts and Adaptation Research Network. He co-chaired the Ontario Expert Panel on Climate Change Adaptation, and chaired the Far North Science Advisory Panel that released its report “Science for a Changing Far North” in 2010. He is currently working with remote far north Ontario First Nation communities assessing the likely impacts of climate change and potential adaptation options. David is a member of the Order of Ontario.

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    Dave Sauchyn – Prairies Chapter

    Dave is Professor of Geography and Environmental Studies at the University of Regina, where he’s been for the past 35 years. Since 2000, he has been affiliated with the Prairie Adaptation Research Collaborative. His main research interests are 1) the climate and hydrology of the past millennium and how knowledge of the past can inform scenarios of future climate and water supplies, and 2) planned adaption to minimize the adverse impacts of climate change on the natural capital of Canada’s western Interior. Dave has been invited to give more than 350 talks on climate change, mostly to rural audiences. He was co-lead author of the Prairies chapter for the previous national assessment. Dave recently co-directed a five-year interdisciplinary study of the vulnerability of agricultural communities to climate extremes in Chile, Argentina, Colombia and Brazil and the Canadian Prairies.

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    Maciej Stetkiewicz – Northern Canada Chapter (co-lead)

    Maciej is the Climate Change and Northern Hydrology Project Coordinator at the Northern Climate ExChange, the climate change research group in the Yukon Research Centre at Yukon College. After obtaining his B.Sc in Geography from the University of Victoria, Maciej became interested in how the Yukon’s environment, especially its hydrological systems, were responding to climate change. His interest in the subject increased substantially while working in the Yukon after school where it was apparent that climate change was influencing all aspects of life in the north. Maciej returned to school to complete a Masters of Sustainable Environmental Management from the University of Saskatchewan where he focused on using interdisciplinary approaches to study how climate change is impacting ice-jam flood frequency at the Town of Peace River, Alberta. At the Northern Climate Exchange, he now works on a wide array of projects ranging from climate change policy to hydrological modelling.

  • Show me the lead authors for the National Issues Report

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    Richard Boyd – Costs and Benefits of Climate Impacts and Adaptation

    Richard is a Senior Fellow - Resilient Communities at All One Sky Foundation, a not-for-profit charitable organization that assists communities at the nexus of energy and climate change. An environmental economist, his research interests include climate change risk assessment and economic decision-making methodologies, and he has authored several resource guides on these topics. Over the last 20 years, he has led numerous assessments of the socioeconomic impacts of climate change on water resources and quality, human health, energy systems and the built environment, as well as the costs and benefits of adaptation actions to inform decision-making at all levels of government, both within Canada and internationally.

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    Craig Brown – Cities and Towns

    Craig holds a PhD in Environmental Applied Science and Management from Ryerson University and works as an interdisciplinary researcher, consultant, and educator in the areas of urban sustainability and climate resilience. He has supported and managed projects at various scales relating to building and urban design, energy efficiency, climate resilience, flood risk management, green infrastructure, and monitoring and evaluation frameworks.

    Canada in a Changing Climate: Advancing our Knowledge for Action (47)

    Ashlee Cunsolo – Rural and Remote (co-lead)

    Ashlee Cunsolo, PhD, is the Director of the Labrador Institute of Memorial University, and a passionate researcher, environmental advocate, and community-engaged social science and health researcher working at the intersection of place, culture, health, and environment. For over a decade, she has been working with Indigenous communities and leaders across Canada on a variety of community-led and community-identified research initiatives, including climate change impacts on physical and mental health, cultural reclamation and intergenerational knowledge sharing within a changing environment, and environmental grief and mourning. In particular, her work in partnership with Inuit in Nunatsiavut on climate change and mental health have become seminal studies globally, and her praxiological contributions onecological grief and mourning have been widely recognized. She is also a contributing author to the IPCC AR6 North America Chapter and the Health Canada Climate Change and Health Assessment Report.

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    Jimena Eyzaguirre – International Dimensions

    Jimena is the international team director and business lead for climate change adaptation at ESSA Technologies Ltd. She has 15 years of experience in policy-relevant research and analysis. Her work since 2006 focuses on equipping individuals and organizations to understand and incorporate the implications of climate-related risks and vulnerabilities into plans and decisions that affect environmental and social outcomes. She has a breadth of Canadian and international experience in adaptation and climate resilience, including in program design, policy analysis, vulnerability assessment, knowledge synthesis and monitoring and evaluation. Jimena is vice president of the Canada-Mathare Education Trust, a Canadian charity dedicated to advancing education in Kenya.

    Canada in a Changing Climate: Advancing our Knowledge for Action (49)

    Paul Kovacs – Climate Disclosure, Litigation and Finance

    Paul is the founder and Executive Director of the Institute for Catastrophic Loss Reduction (ICLR) at Western University, an independent, not-for-profit centre for multi-disciplinary disaster prevention research and communications. His research interest is insurance and adaptation to climate extremes. This includes action to build communities resilient to damage from urban flooding, tornadoes, catastrophic earthquakes and interface wildfire. Since 1996, Paul has been a volunteer with the United Nations’ Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), the international body for assessing the science related to climate change.

    Canada in a Changing Climate: Advancing our Knowledge for Action (50)

    Don Lemmen – Sector Impacts and Adaptation Perspectives

    Donobtained his PhD from the University of Alberta in 1988, studying past environmental change in the Canadian High Arctic. As the past researchmanager in the Climate Change Impacts and Adaptation Division of Natural Resources Canada, heled development of three Canadian national assessment reports of climate change impacts and adaptation, while contributing to other national, regional and global assessments. Internationally, he has been involved in the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) process since 2003, including four years as co-chair of the UNFCCC Adaptation Committee. In 2019 he received an honourary Doctor of Environmental Studies from University of Waterloo for his career contributions to climate change adaptation.

    Canada in a Changing Climate: Advancing our Knowledge for Action (51)

    Michelle Molnar – Ecosystem Services

    Michelle works at the David Suzuki Foundation as an Environmental Economist and Policy Analyst, where she focuses on the conservation of natural capital using various tools of ecological economics, policy analysis, and public outreach. She teaches Introduction to Ecological Economics at the British Columbia Institute of Technology through the Sustainable Business Leadership Program and sits on the boardof the Canadian Society for Ecological Economics. Michelle has an M.A. in Public Policy from Simon Fraser University and in Philosophy from the University of Western Ontario.

    Canada in a Changing Climate: Advancing our Knowledge for Action (52)

    Kelly Vodden – Rural and Remote (co-lead)

    Kelly is Associate Professor and Associate Vice-President of Research and Graduate Studies at Grenfell Campus, Memorial University. She has been engaged in community and regional development research, policy and practice in Canadian rural communities for more than twenty-five years, including projects related to climate change impacts and adaptation in rural regions in British Columbia, Ontario, Saskatchewan, Newfoundland and Labrador (NL) and internationally. Kelly led a multi-year project to investigate and develop tools to assess climate change vulnerability and adaptation options in NL for the federal-provincial Atlantic Canada Adaptation Solutions Association, leading the development of climate change assessment reports for six communities and of a workbook for communities. She has also led several multi-year research projects with colleagues across the country on topics ranging from regional development to the sustainability of rural drinking water systems and community impacts of an increasingly mobile workforce. Kelly has presented and published widely on her work.

    Al Pietroniro – Water Resources

    Al is Professor and Chair in Sustainable Water Resources in a Changing Climate at the Schulich School of Engineering at the University of Calgary. He was formerly the Director of Environment Canada Water and Climate Services based at the National Hydrology Research Centre in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. He is Adjunct Professor in the Centre for Hydrology, University of Saskatchewan; Adjunct Professor in the Department of Civil Engineering, University of Waterloo and Associate Faculty, Department of Environmental Biology, University of Guelph. He graduated with distinction from the Agricultural Engineering Program at McGill University. He received Department Scholarships from the Department of Civil Engineering, University of Waterloo and holds a Citation of Excellence, Department of Environment. Al is Canadian Delegate to the WMO Commission on Hydrology; President of the International Association of Hydrological Sciences – Commission of Remote Sensing and a registered professional engineer in the Province of Saskatchewan.

    Canada in a Changing Climate: Advancing our Knowledge for Action (53)

    Fiona Warren – Introduction

    Fiona is the Assessment Manager with the Climate Change Impacts and Adaptation Division at Natural Resources Canada. She leads Canada in a Changing Climate, the national knowledge assessment, and the development and editing of the National Issues and Regional Perspectives reports. Fiona has extensive experience working on science assessments as a science editor, lead author and project coordinator (2004, 2008 and 2016). She also led the development of the 2014 assessment entitled Canada in a Changing Climate: Sector Perspectives on Impacts and Adaptation. She was a contributing author of the North America chapter in the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and has been an expert reviewer of several reports and papers on climate change issues. She holds a Master of Science in Geography from McMaster University and a Bachelor of Science (with honours) in Environmental Science from Queen’s University.

  • Show me the lead authors for the Health of Canadians in a Changing Climate Report

    Canada in a Changing Climate: Advancing our Knowledge for Action (54)

    Peter Berry, PhD (Editor)

    Since arriving at Health Canada in 1999, Dr. Peter Berry has conducted research in several areas related to climate change including health risks to Canadians, adaptive capacity, health vulnerability assessment and communicating climate change risks to the public. He is currently a Senior Policy Analyst and Science Advisor to the Director at the Climate Change and Innovation Bureau at Health Canada. Peter actively participates in a number of collaborative efforts related to understanding the impacts of climate change on health and supporting the development of effective adaptation measures. Peter has had the the great privileledge of collaborating with health authorities from local to international levels to increase understanding of climate change impacts on health and develop effective measures to build the resilience of individuals, communities and health systems.Peter serves as an Adjunct Assistant Professor in the Faculty of Environment at the University of Waterloo and as an Adjunct Research Professor at the Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Carleton University.

    Canada in a Changing Climate: Advancing our Knowledge for Action (55)

    Rebekka Schnitter, MCC (Editor)
    Health Canada

    Upon completing her Bachelor of Science in geography at the University of Victoria, Rebekka obtained a master’s degree in climate change from the University of Waterloo. She is a policy analyst at Health Canada’s Climate Change and Innovation Bureau where she supports the development of the national climate change and health assessment as a co-editor of the assessment report and as a lead author of the chapters on health equity, and food safety and security.

    Canada in a Changing Climate: Advancing our Knowledge for Action (56)

    Céline Campagna, PhD
    Institut national de santé publique du Québec and Centre Terre, Eau, Environnement of the Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique

    Céline Campagna is a researcher at Québec National Institute of Public Health (INSPQ - Institut national de santé publique du Québec). Since 2017, she heads the scientific program in Climate change and health for Québec and holds an expertise in health issues related to climate, water, food and zoonosis. She is also adjunct professor at Centre Terre, Eau, Environnement of the Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique (INRS-ETE), as well as at Université Laval - department of Social and preventive medicine, in Québec.

    (Video) Release of the Prairie Provinces Chapter of Canada in a Changing Climate | A PRAC Webinar

    Canada in a Changing Climate: Advancing our Knowledge for Action (57)

    Dr. Margo Greenwood, O.C.

    Dr. Margo Greenwood, Academic Leader of the National Collaborating Centre for Indigenous Health, is an Indigenous scholar of Cree ancestry with years of experience focused on the health and well-being of Indigenous children, families and communities. She is also Vice-President of Indigenous Health, Northern Health, and Professor in both the First Nations Studies and Education programs at the University of Northern British Columbia. Dr. Greenwood has received numerous awards for her achievements in early childhood education and health policy, including the Queen's Jubilee medal (2002), BC Academic of the Year (2010) and National Aboriginal Achievement Award for Education (2011.) She is honoured to be appointed as an Officer of the Order of Canada (2021.).

    Canada in a Changing Climate: Advancing our Knowledge for Action (58)

    Sherilee Harper, PhD
    University of Alberta

    Sherilee Harper is an Associate Professor in the School of Public Health at the University of Alberta and a Canada Research Chair in Climate Change and Health. Her research investigates associations between weather, environment, and Indigenous health in the context of climate change, and she collaborates with Indigenous partners to prioritise climate-related health actions, planning, interventions, and research. She is a Lead Author on the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Special Report on the Ocean and Cryosphere in a Changing Climate (SROCC); Lead Author on the IPCC’s Sixth Assessment Report (AR6-WG2); serves on the Gender Task Group for the IPCC; and serves on the Editorial Board of Epidemiology and Infection (area of specialty: climate change and infectious disease).

    Canada in a Changing Climate: Advancing our Knowledge for Action (59)

    Katie Hayes, PhD
    Health Canada

    Katie Hayes is senior policy analyst at Health Canada’s Climate Change and Innovation Bureau. She completed her PhD at the Dalla Lana School of Public Health at the University of Toronto (UofT). Her doctoral research explored the mental health consequences of climate change, with a specific focus on addressing the inequitable risks and impacts on marginalized groups. Katie has published a number of recent articles exploring the public health consequences of climate change. She holds an M.A from Royal Roads University in International Communications and a B.A in Sociology and Intercultural Education.

    Canada in a Changing Climate: Advancing our Knowledge for Action (60)

    Tim K. Takaro, MD, MPH, MS
    Simon Fraser University

    Dr. Takaro is a physician-scientist trained in occupational and environmental medicine, public health and toxicology, at Yale, the University of North Carolina and University of Washington and in 2017 began his second term as Associate Dean for Research at Simon Fraser University. His research is primarily directed toward the links between human exposures and disease, and determining public health based preventive solutions to such risks. These include disease susceptibility factors in environmental and occupational health, particularly inflammatory lung conditions, including asthma, chronic beryllium disease and asbestosis. His work includes use of biological and other markers for medical surveillance, exposure assessment, and disease susceptibility with a focus on immunologic lung disease, human health and war, clinical occupational and environmental health and population resiliency in the health effects of climate change. Current research on human health and climate change focuses on water quality in BC communities and the interaction of cumulative exposures related to resource extraction and climate change.

    Canada in a Changing Climate: Advancing our Knowledge for Action (61)

    Donna Atkinson, MA
    National Collaborating Centre for Indigenous Health

    Donna Atkinson is the Manager of the National Collaborating Centre for Indigenous Health. She graduated with a Master of Arts degree in History in 2005 from the University of Northern British Columbia focused on the Indigenous rights movement and oil and gas development in Northwest Siberia in the Soviet and post-Soviet era. Prior to joining the NCCIH in 2006, Donna worked as a researcher on community-based, qualitative research projects focused on Indigenous health and sustainable resource management.

    Canada in a Changing Climate: Advancing our Knowledge for Action (62)

    Nicholas Ogden, BVSc DPhil
    Public Health Agency of Canada

    Dr. Nick Ogden is a UK-trained veterinarian (University of Liverpool, 1983). After 10 years of mixed clinical practice, he then completed a doctorate in Lyme disease ecology at the Department of Zoology, University of Oxford in 1996. During the six years he spent as a professor at the Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Liverpool, he continued his research into the ecology and epidemiology of tick-borne diseases of public health importance in Europe and those of importance to livestock production in Africa. In 2002 he moved to Canada, where he continued research on the ecology of Lyme disease and other zoonoses and climate change as a research scientist at the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC). As interim Director of the Environmental Issues Division of PHAC he directed a program on climate change and vector- and water-borne disease risks, and community adaptation to these risks. As Director of the Zoonoses Division he directed programs on national coordination, surveillance and prevention of zoonoses including Lyme disease and West Nile virus. He is now a senior research scientist and Director of Public Health Risk Sciences division within the National Microbiology Laboratory of PHAC focusing on assessing risk by study of the ecology, epidemiology and genetic diversity of vectors and zoonotic and vector-borne micro-organisms, assessing impacts of climate change on zoonoses and vector-borne diseases, and developing tools for public health adaptation.

    Canada in a Changing Climate: Advancing our Knowledge for Action (63)

    Pierre Gosselin, MD MPH
    Institut national de santé publique du Québec and Centre Terre, Eau, Environnement of the Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique

    Pierre just retired from his work at the Quebec Public Health Institute (INSPQ), as a consulting physician for the joint Ouranos-INSPQ research and adaptation program in climate change and health, which he lead from 2004 to 2019. He was also in charge of the Health component of the Quebec Action Plan on Climate Change (2007-2017). He is also a clinical professor in preventive medicine at Université Laval and an associate at Institut national de la recherche scientifique, both in Quebec City. Pierre was trained as a physician (Université Laval) and in environmental health (University of California at Berkeley).

    Paddy Enright
    Health Canada and University of Waterloo

    Paddy Enright is a Policy Analyst within Health Canada’s Climate Change and Innovation Bureau. Paddy has completed a B.A. in Environmental Studies and Geography from Bishop’s University and a M.Sc. in Bioresource Engineering from McGill University. Paddy is currently a PhD candidate within the Department of Geography and Environmental Management at the University of Waterloo. In his PhD research Paddy is exploring means of fostering climate-resilience within rural Canadian health systems.

    Canada in a Changing Climate: Advancing our Knowledge for Action (64)

    Roberta Stout, M.A.
    National Collaborating Centre for Indigenous Health

    Roberta Stout is Cree and a member of the Kehewin First Nation, located in Alberta. She holds an undergraduate degree in Interdisciplinary Studies from Carleton University, a graduate degree in Latin American Studies from Simon Fraser University, and a Cree Language Immersion Certificate from Blue Quills First Nations College. Since 1998, Roberta has led concurrent and multi-year research projects on the determinants of related to Indigenous peoples. She is currently a Research Associate with the National Collaborating Centre for Indigenous Health and resides in Winnipeg, Manitoba.

    Regine Halseth
    National Collaborating Centre for Indigenous Health

    Regine Halseth has worked as a Research Associate with the National Collaborating Centre for Aboriginal Indigenous Health at the University of Northern British Columbia for the past 11 years. After graduating from the University of Victoria in 1986, she worked for five years as a researcher for the Social Program Evaluation Group at Queen’s University. She then moved to the University of Northern British Columbia where she worked as a researcher on several projects, including a Forest Renewal Research Grant on Community Participation in the New Forest Economy, a project on Indigenous land claims, and a Community-University Research Alliance grant, “Partnering for Sustainable Resource Management.”

    Canada in a Changing Climate: Advancing our Knowledge for Action (65)

    Phil Blagden
    Health Canada

    Phil Blagden is a science advisor in Health Canada’s air quality program and has more than thirty years of experience in government as a scientist and policy advisor in the field of environmental pollution, primarily in the area of indoor and outdoor air quality.

Contact us

nrcan.adaptation.rncan@nrcan-rncan.gc.ca

FAQs

How is Canada action against climate change? ›

Canada passed the Canadian Net-Zero Emissions Accountability Act in June 2021 which enshrines its 2050 net zero target into law. The act also mandates the setting of intermediary targets at five-year intervals (2030, 2035, 2040, 2045), and the requirement to develop emission reductions plans for these targets.

Is Canada a good country for climate change? ›

A recent study on the global economic impacts of climate change by Moody's concluded that Canada could be a “climate winner”: one of few countries that might benefit from a warming world.

What are the main causes of climate change in Canada? ›

Human activity is the main cause of climate change. People burn fossil fuels and convert land from forests to agriculture. Since the beginning of the Industrial Revolution, people have burned more and more fossil fuels and changed vast areas of land from forests to farmland.

How can we take action on climate change? ›

Start with these ten actions to help tackle the climate crisis.
  1. Save energy at home. ...
  2. Walk, bike, or take public transport. ...
  3. Eat more vegetables. ...
  4. Consider your travel. ...
  5. Throw away less food. ...
  6. Reduce, reuse, repair & recycle. ...
  7. Change your home's source of energy. ...
  8. Switch to an electric vehicle.

What is the most important initiative Canada should take for reducing climate change? ›

having established light-duty zero-emission vehicles policy sales targets of 10 percent by 2025, 30 percent by 2030, and 100 percent by 2040. providing a purchase incentive of up to $5,000 on eligible zero-emission vehicles. increasing the stringency of emissions standards for passenger vehicles and most trucks.

What are the benefits of climate change? ›

The chief benefits of global warming include: fewer winter deaths; lower energy costs; better agricultural yields; probably fewer droughts; maybe richer biodiversity.

How much does Canada contribute to climate change? ›

Greenhouse gas emissions for the world and the top 10 emitting countries and regions, 2005 and 2019
Country or region2005 greenhouse gas emissions (megatonnes of carbon dioxide equivalent)Share of global greenhouse gas emissions in 2019 (percent)
Canada6911.5%
Rest of the world Footnote B12 29831.8%
World38 938100.0%
9 more rows
25 Aug 2022

Are there any benefits to climate change? ›

Also, studies show that, up to a certain point, crops and other plants grow better in the presence of higher carbon dioxide levels and seem to be more drought-tolerant. [1] But this benefit is a two-edged sword: weeds, many invasive plant species, and insect pests will also thrive in a warmer world.

How is climate change affecting the Canadian economy? ›

Since 2010, the costs of weather-related disasters and catastrophic events have amounted to about 5 to 6 per cent of Canada's annual GDP growth, up from an average of 1 per cent in previous decades.

How does climate affect where people live in Canada? ›

Due to Canada's very cold climate our population is not as high as country's like the U.S. The climate is gets more cold norther of Canada. This is the reason why the provinces are more populated than the territories.

What is the biggest contributor to climate change in Canada? ›

By far the largest source of GHG emission in Canada comes from the combustion of fossil fuels to make energy, including heat and electricity.

Why do we need to take action on climate change now? ›

Climate change won't just impact forest, or coral reefs, or even people in far-off countries – it will affect all of us. From more extreme weather to increasing food prices, to recreation and decreased opportunities to appreciate the natural world, people everywhere will feel its effects.

What is the most effective solution to climate change? ›

Changing our main energy sources to clean and renewable energy is the best way to stop using fossil fuels. These include technologies like solar, wind, wave, tidal and geothermal power. Switch to sustainable transport. Petrol and diesel vehicles, planes and ships use fossil fuels.

How can we help save the environment from climate change essay? ›

How To Prevent Climate Change Essay
  1. Make policies and agreements on climate change.
  2. Implement projects on clean energy.
  3. Create social awareness on climate change.
  4. Prohibit deforestation and cutting down trees.
  5. Conduct capacity building programs on climate change.
  6. Keep the surroundings clean.

Who is responsible for taking action on climate change? ›

EPA works with industry and others to reduce greenhouse gas emissions through regulatory initiatives and partnership programs. Within the Agency, EPA implements a range of strategies to reduce its own greenhouse gas emissions, increase energy efficiency, and take other steps to reduce its carbon footprint.

How is Canada helping the environment? ›

Over the past 5 years, Canada has taken significant and urgent action to address the climate crisis. Canada is phasing out traditional coal-fired power plants and embracing renewable energy. It is investing in Made-in-Canada technologies and clean solutions.

When did climate change become an issue in Canada? ›

Since the 1950s, many of the observed changes are unprecedented over decades to millennia 1. In Canada, these changes include rising temperatures, shifting rainfall patterns, and increases in certain types of hazardous weather.

How does climate affect human life? ›

Climate change is already impacting health in a myriad of ways, including by leading to death and illness from increasingly frequent extreme weather events, such as heatwaves, storms and floods, the disruption of food systems, increases in zoonoses and food-, water- and vector-borne diseases, and mental health issues.

What are the main effects of climate change? ›

More frequent and intense drought, storms, heat waves, rising sea levels, melting glaciers and warming oceans can directly harm animals, destroy the places they live, and wreak havoc on people's livelihoods and communities. As climate change worsens, dangerous weather events are becoming more frequent or severe.

What is climate change short essay? ›

Climate change refers to the change in the environmental conditions of the earth. This happens due to many internal and external factors. The climatic change has become a global concern over the last few decades. Besides, these climatic changes affect life on the earth in various ways.

Why does Canada produce so much carbon dioxide? ›

These increases are primarily due to GHG emissions resulting from human activities such as the use of fossil fuels or agriculture. This changing climate has impacts on the environment, human health and the economy. The indicators report estimates of Canada's emissions of GHGs over time.

How much does Canada contribute to global carbon emissions? ›

Canada's greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions currently represent about 1.6 percent of the global total.

Is Canada a carbon negative country? ›

Is Canada carbon negative?Canada is one of the major nations leading the way when it comes to climate change and has increased its targets to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 2030. However, despite being a country with lots of forest areas, it is not carbon negative.

What will happen if we don't stop climate change? ›

The wildlife we love and their habitat will be destroyed, leading to mass species extinction. Superstorms, drought, and heat waves would become increasingly common and more extreme, leading to major health crises and illness. Agricultural production would plummet, likely leading to global food shortages and famine.

Who is most affected by climate change? ›

According to this analysis, based on the impacts of extreme weather events and the socio-economic losses they cause, Japan, the Philippines and Germany are the most affected places by climate change today.

What part of Canada will be least affected by climate change? ›

Of the major Canadian cities included in the index, Calgary is the lowest on the list. Ranked in the 68th spot, its climate type won't change from a continental humid warm summer but they could see the average temperature rise by 2.14 C by 2050.

How does climate change positively affect the economy? ›

There will be more opportunity in clean energy, resilient and green buildings, and energy efficiency. Hybrid and electric vehicle production and the electric public transit sector are expected to grow. Construction of green infrastructure and more resilient coastal infrastructure could create many new jobs.

Where is the best place to live in Canada due to climate change? ›

Leading the country in their plan to address the challenges of climate change was Kingston, Ontario, followed closely by Ontario's Waterloo Region and Hamilton. New Westminster, British Columbia was identified as having the most work to do.

What is the best place to live with climate change? ›

Sacramento, California is the best place to live for climate change in 2022. 60% of the top 10 places to live in the U.S. for climate change are in California.

How might Canada lead or assist other countries in reducing their carbon emissions? ›

International leadership

Governments will work with their international partners, including developing countries, to help reduce emissions around the world. The federal government is investing $2.65 billion in climate finance to help developing countries transition to low-carbon economies and build climate resilience.

How much pollution does Canada produce? ›

Our annual emissions. Canada emits roughly 700 megatonnes of CO2 each year. This does not include any impacts from forests or other parts of our landscape, such as wetlands and farmland.

How does Canada rank in pollution? ›

As shown, Canada ranks 9th out of 33 countries based on the two air quality indicators: average exposure to fine particulate matter and fine particulate matter exceedance.

How has the government responded to climate change? ›

EPA works with industry and others to reduce greenhouse gas emissions through regulatory initiatives and partnership programs. Within the Agency, EPA implements a range of strategies to reduce its own greenhouse gas emissions, increase energy efficiency, and take other steps to reduce its carbon footprint.

How is Canada doing with the Paris agreement? ›

Canada plays an active and constructive role in the UNFCCC negotiations and was a strong voice in the negotiations towards the establishment of the Paris Agreement. Canada's current NDC adopts a target to reduce its economy-wide greenhouse gas emissions by 40-45% below 2005 levels by 2030.

What is the Ontario government doing about climate change? ›

Ontario's new forecast predicts it will hit its 2030 target by reducing emissions by 12 MT from current levels. Those reductions would come primarily from three sources: Greater renewable content in gasoline. Stricter emissions standards for heavy industry.

What level of government is responsible for climate change Canada? ›

Under the Constitution of Canada, responsibility for environmental management in Canada is a shared responsibility between the federal government and provincial governments.

Who is responsible for climate change? ›

Rich countries, including the United States, Canada, Japan and much of western Europe, account for just 12 percent of the global population today but are responsible for 50 percent of all the planet-warming greenhouse gases released from fossil fuels and industry over the past 170 years.

What are 10 ways to stop climate change? ›

10 Ways to Stop Global Warming
  1. Change a light. Replacing one regular light bulb with a compact fluorescent light bulb will save 150 pounds of carbon dioxide a year.
  2. Drive less. ...
  3. Recycle more. ...
  4. Check your tires. ...
  5. Use less hot water. ...
  6. Avoid products with a lot of packaging. ...
  7. Adjust your thermostat. ...
  8. Plant a tree.

Are we doing enough to stop climate change? ›

Yes. While we cannot stop global warming overnight, we can slow the rate and limit the amount of global warming by reducing human emissions of heat-trapping gases and soot (“black carbon”).

How does climate change affect Canada's economy? ›

Since 2010, the costs of weather-related disasters and catastrophic events have amounted to about 5 to 6 per cent of Canada's annual GDP growth, up from an average of 1 per cent in previous decades.

How much did Canada spend on climate change? ›

Canada's Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, pictured on March 24, 2022, has announced Can$9.1 billion in climate action.

What is Canada's carbon plan? ›

The 2030 Emissions Reduction Plan is an ambitious and achievable roadmap that outlines a sector-by-sector path for Canada to reach its emissions reduction target of 40 percent below 2005 levels by 2030 and net-zero emissions by 2050.

What is the Canadian government doing to stop climate change? ›

In March 2022, the Government of Canada introduced Canada's 2030 Emissions Reduction Plan, which provides a roadmap for the Canadian economy to achieve 40-45% emissions reductions below 2005 levels by 2030, building upon the actions outlined in Canada's previous climate plans.

What is the climate change action plan? ›

A Climate Action Plan (CAP) provides a science-based strategy to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and address ways the climate is already changing. Many states, cities, and counties are creating Climate Action Plans in order to better understand their own baseline emissions and develop a path toward decarbonization.

What is causing climate change in Ontario? ›

Natural climate change occurs over time. But, human activities are creating excessive amounts of greenhouse gases, causing our climate to change faster. These activities include burning fossil fuels to power cars, heat homes, and run manufacturing plants. Deforestation is another big factor.

When did climate change start in Canada? ›

Since the 1950s, many of the observed changes are unprecedented over decades to millennia 1. In Canada, these changes include rising temperatures, shifting rainfall patterns, and increases in certain types of hazardous weather.

Why is climate change important? ›

The impacts of climate change on different sectors of society are interrelated. Drought can harm food production and human health. Flooding can lead to disease spread and damages to ecosystems and infrastructure. Human health issues can increase mortality, impact food availability, and limit worker productivity.

Where is the safest place on earth from climate change? ›

According to the Climate Change Performance Index (CCPI), published by the independent monitoring agency, the top three countries leading in climate protection are all Scandinavian: Denmark, Sweden, and Norway, while the United Kingdom is ranked fourth in climate protection.

Videos

1. Atlantic Chapter Release, Canada in a Changing Climate, and Introduction to CLIMAtlantic
(CLIMAtlantic)
2. Climate Change and Indigenous Peoples’ Health in Canada
(NCCEH / CCNSE)
3. Should We Adapt or Retreat? Flooding and Erosion Risk in a Changing Climate
(WSP)
4. Sustainable food systems: food production & security in a changing climate
(The University of Western Australia)
5. Release of the BC Chapter of Canada in a Changing Climate: Regional Perspectives Report (webinar)
(Fraser Basin Council)
6. CMOS Channel _ Key Findings from Canada's Changing Climate Report
(Meteorological and Oceanographic Society CMOS)
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